Changing Capitals to Lowercase

by Heather

Proofreaders’ Marks

Maybe caps lock was on. Or maybe the author just got a little carried away, capitalizing anything that seemed remotely important. Either way those capitals need to be lowercased. So how do you mark that on your document? It’s easy: you just use a slash:And you don’t have to worry about your lowercase markup being confused with a deletion mark because you’re remembering to add that little flourish to your deletion marks like I showed you in the last proofreaders’ marks entry, right?

So you can slash through those unnecessary capitals with confidence, knowing they’ll be brought down to size. Nevertheless, it’s a good idea to put a circled* lc in the margin next to the line so no one misses your markup:

*Unless it’s an official proofreaders’ mark, you need to enclose any markup you don’t want added to the text within a circle. If your lc appears uncircled, it’s possible that an inputter (who isn’t reading for content but just inserting changes) will add the letters l and c into the document—oops.

Edit: A friend recently asked me what she should do if she wanted to make an entire word or a series of letters lowercase. Should she draw a slash through each letter?

In order to save you time, I realized that I should address that issue here. If you have a series of letters, a whole word, or a sentence that you’d like to lowercase, you can simply draw a slash through the first letter and then draw a line horizontally from the slash above the rest of the letters you’d like to make lowercase:

Wondering how to make lowercase letters into capitals or small capitals? You can find out how here.

That red pencil still burning a hole in your pocket protector? You can find a full listing of all the Word Blog’s Proofreaders’ Marks entries here.

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